2006 Baseball Hall of Fame Ballot
David Pinto -
Baseball Musings

Voting For:
RICH GOSSAGE
From 1977 to 1985 (1975 if you discount his year as a starter) Gossage dominated.  He posted a 2.10 ERA, struck out 8.6 per
9 and allowed just .5 homers per 9.  He defined the modern reliever in a number of ways.  At first, he was the iron man, going
about two innings per appearance.  Later, the Yankees introduced the set up man (Ron Davis) to try to save wear and tear on
Goose.  More than Fingers or Sutter, Gossage defined the role of closer, and I believe he should go in for that.

JIM RICE
Of Rice, Dawson and Murphy, Rice in my opinion is the only one that deserves Hall of Fame consideration.  Rice is not a
perfect candidate.  He grounded into a lot of double plays and didn’t walk enough for a power hitter.  But he was quite the
power hitter in his day.  Unlike Murphy, Rice had a long period of superior performance.  Unlike Dawson, he wasn’t an out
machine.

Rice also impressed me with his intelligence as a hitter.  While his right-handed teammates would try to pull balls in Yankee
Stadium, Rice would go the other way to hit homers over the shorter right-center fence. Not known for his fielding, he played
the wall at Fenway to perfection.  His 1978 season is one of the great power seasons of the pre power era that started in 1993.

Rice was never loved by the press, and it’s my feeling that his lack of election comes from that.  If Rice had the personality of
Joe Carter, Jim would be in easily.

A big negative, however, is that Rice was greatly helped by Fenway Park.  His slugging percentage was 100 points higher at
home.  Despite that, I’m still giving Jim the vote.

ALAN TRAMMELL
He was a shortstop who could get on base and hit for some power.  He batted cleanup when it was unusual for a shortstop to
do so. A good shortstop, too.


Not Voting For:
RICK AGUILERA

ALBERT BELLE
Belle was a great hitter, but he just didn’t last long enough.  He did have his Hall of Fame moments, however.  His 100 extra-
base hits in a strike shortened season is one of the great feats of hitting.  It’s like Koufax throwing four no-hitters.  Some feats
stand out so much that you just have to put the person in the hall.  However, he also has the corked bat incident, which
somewhat negates that feeling.

BERT BLYLEVEN
Blyleven had one great season in 1973, and a seven year span around that when he was consistently good.  Otherwise, he
was very up and down throughout his career.  Getting into the Hall should be about more than just longevity.

WILL CLARK
My main problem with Clark is that he didn’t hit for power the way a first baseman should.  His 35 homers in 1987 were a
career high; he didn’t go back up when offense increased in the 1990s.  Looking at his stats, he’s a better hitter than I
remember, but certainly not the best of his comtemporaries.

DAVE CONCEPCION

ANDRE DAWSON
The .323 OBA kills it for me.  I’m glad we’re by the idea that 400 home runs lands someone in the hall.

GARY DiSARCINA

ALEX FERNANDEZ

GARY GAETTI

STEVE GARVEY
I have a visceral dislike of Steve Garvey.  On top of that, he was just a first baseman with a high batting average.

DWIGHT GOODEN
Despite all the drug problems, he still had an amazing career.  However, we should be debating whether Gooden or Clemens
was the best pitcher of their generation.

OZZIE GUILLEN

OREL HERSHISHER
He might be voted in for breaking Drysdale’s consecutive inning record, but Don shouldn’t be in the Hall either.

GREGG JEFFERIES
His career never matched the initial hype.

TOMMY JOHN
A player I really like, but was too dependent on his team for his success.

DOUG JONES
Doug had some brilliant seasons, but never consistently.  He’s living proof that you don’t have to throw hard to be successful
from the mound.

DON MATTINGLY
His time as a power hitter was too short.  He was the best of his time at turning the 3-6-3 double play.

WILLIE MCGEE
Almost all his offensive value is in his batting average.  That’s okay if you hit .360.

HAL MORRIS

JACK MORRIS
I remember Jack Morris as a dominant pitcher.  I’d like to think his 3.90 ERA is due to playing most of his career in good hitter’
s parks, but he ended with the same ERA home and road.  He did pitch one of the great post-season games ever.  I’d really
like to vote for Jack based on my memories of him, but I can’t.

DALE MURPHY
He posted five excellent seasons but he was washed up by age 32.  He laid a good foundation for a Hall of Fame career but
never finished the building.

DAVE PARKER
Even without the stigma of drugs, Parker only had one good season after the age of 28.

LEE SMITH
He blew too many games for my fantasy starting pitchers.  

BRUCE SUTTER
Sutter’s career was just too short for me..

WALT WEISS

JOHN WETTELAND